Online dating secondary research

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During my speech I will define online dating, different online dating sites,... Mary was about six feet even, with long jet black hair that comes to her waist line. She went searching at malls, bars, and even at church, but she was still unsuccessful...

These websites are to help a person to get to know one another with the idea of meeting and possibly dating. With websites like EHarmony, Match, and Christian Mingle single people are presented with an opportunity that is more accessible at any moment.

the criteria used by dating sites for matching or for selecting which profiles a user gets to peruse." Instead, research touted by online sites is conducted in-house with study methods and data collection treated as proprietary secrets, and, therefore, not verifiable by outside parties.

Online dating fundamentally changes access to information.

• Men were approximately 40 percent more likely to initiate contact with a woman after viewing her profile than women were after viewing a man's profile (12.5 to 9 percent). The authors caution that matching sites' emphasis on finding a perfect match, or soulmate, may encourage an unrealistic and destructive approach to relationships.

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As online dating has become a widely accepted way to attract possible romantic partners, scholars have been taking a closer look at the practice.

and to become vengeful in response to partner aggression when they feel insecure in the relationship," the authors write.

Online dating sites are not "scientific." Despite claims of using a "science-based" approach with sophisticated algorithm-based matching, the authors found "no published, peer-reviewed papers -- or Internet postings, for that matter -- that explained in sufficient detail …

By 2005, among single adults Americans who were Internet users and currently seeking a romantic partner, 37 percent had dated online.

According to research by Michael Rosenfeld, a professor of sociology at Stanford University, in 2007-2009, 22 percent of heterosexual couples and 61 percent of same-sex couples had found their partners through the Web.

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